How To Properly Hold A Boom Pole And Microphone


Whether you’re a seasoned audio professional, a newcomer, or an extra body on a film set, you may be tasked with operating the boom pole and microphone. Boom mics are excellent for capturing sound for video without being included in the frame. Holding a boom pole properly will maximize the effectiveness of a boom microphone and dramatically increase the quality of the production!

So how do we properly hold a boom pole and microphone? Holding the boom pole comfortably, over your head, and with minimal movement is ideal. When holding a boom pole/mic, it’s crucial you keep them out of the shot; point the mic at the subject; keep handling noise and movement to a minimum, and keep yourself out of the way as much as possible.

As you’ve probably gathered from the brief answer above, there’s no one perfect way to hold a boom pole. There are, however, general guidelines to follow that will improve your boom operating skills (and get you hired again)! Let’s dive into these guidelines in this article.

To learn about my recommended boom microphones, check out My New Microphone’s Best Boom Microphones For Film.


How To Properly Hold A Boom Pole And Microphone

There’s no one perfect way to hold up a boom pole when recording. However, there are plenty of ways to hold a microphone boom pole effectively.

Boom microphones are typically used in film and video recording. The purpose of the boom pole/mic is to get a microphone as close to the subject as possible without the mic or pole showing up in the video frame.

Lavaliers are often utilized along with boom mics to capture sound. Lavalier microphones usually need to be hidden in clothing and can pick up a lot of movement noise. Boom microphones are relatively free of handling noise.

To learn more about lavalier microphones, check out the following My New Microphone articles:
How And Where To Attach A Lavalier/Lapel Microphone
Best Lavalier Microphones For
Interviews/News/Presentations
Best Lavalier Microphones For Actors.

To hold a microphone boom pole effectively, boom operators must not only position their booms in the right spot but position themselves correctly as well. The boom pole is almost always held overhead with the mic pointing at the subject as close as possible. The boom operator shouldn’t be too far in front of the camera operator to avoid being in the shot themselves.

The basic steps to holding a microphone boom pole are as follows:

First, extend the boom pole so that you can stand up straight and still reach the subject without being on camera.

Hold the boom pole straight over your head with both arms extended upward, hands slightly shoulder-width apart. Stand up straight if possible. The boom pole’s length should be left to right according to your stance. If the microphone end of the boom is to your left, turn your head to the left direction to see exactly how you’re pointing the mic. If the mic is to the right, turn your head to the right.

The grip can be either straight (both palms facing away from you) or you can utilize a switch grip. I prefer a straight grip.

If space allows, holding the boom pole closer to the center of its length (with the excess pole to the rear) may make the boom seem lighter and more balanced. If space doesn’t allow, hold the pole near the end.

To change the direction of where the microphone is pointing, roll your wrists. Alter the direction of the microphone without changing your grip if at all possible.

How To Manage The XLR Cable

Typically the boom mic is not wireless and so an XLR cable will be carrying the microphone signal to where it needs to go. Obviously, we don’t want the cable to droop from the microphone casing into the video frame so we need to manage the cable somehow.

Oftentimes, we’ll see an XLR cable wrapped tightly around the pole in a spiral along the pole’s length. This is a standard way of managing an XLR cable on a boom.

During rushed shoots, I’ve quickly tied the XLR cable at the end of the boom pole with a velcro loop, pulled the cable tight, and held the cable and pole toward the middle with my other hand. This works in a rush but has the potential to slowly slip away from the pole.

I wouldn’t suggest doing the above without securing the cable to at least the end of the pole.

It’s best practice to keep the XLR cable against the pole. Allowing the cable to roll along or hit the pole will cause unwanted handling noise.

Alternatively, there are boom poles that have coiled XLR cable inside the pole itself. The coiled cable stretches out to fit the variable length of the boom pole. In this case, we don’t have to worry about the XLR along the length of the boom pole.

At the end of the pole, the XLR most likely goes to either a standalone audio recorder or a camera.

Standalone recorders can be carried on your person. This minimizes trip hazards and allows for more freedom from the camera operators.

If the XLR is running into a camera, caution must be taken not to cause unnecessary trip hazards. Caution must also be taken not to run out of cable length, causing pulling between you and your teammates!


Additional Tips For Holding A Boom Pole

Here is a checklist to help you effectively hold a boom pole/microphone:

  • Keep the boom pole/mic out of frame
  • Minimize handling noise
  • Point the mic at the subject
  • Minimize tripping hazards
  • Don’t be in the way. Go with the flow!

Let’s discuss each of these in a bit more detail, shall we?

Keep The Boom Pole/Mic Out Of Frame

This may seem obviously critical because it is. Otherwise perfect takes can be ruined by the boom microphone dipping into the frame.

Boom microphones are nearly always positioned overhead to capture the best sound. Overhead allows us to get close to the subject without invading too much of their immediate space. Unless the talent will be jumping or throwing their arms in the air, it’s usually safe to hover the boom mic right above their heads.

Keep the boom pole and mic close to the subject but not so close that they show up in the frame.

Minimize Handling Noise

Though most boom mics are hosted in an insulated shock mount, they are not completely immune to boom pole handing noise.

Examples of handling noise include:

  • XLR cable tapping the pole.
  • Switching of grip.
  • Boom pole bumping into something.
  • Repositioning the boom pole.

Holding up a boom pole can be extremely tiring on the shoulders. Oftentimes, ops will periodically move the boom pole to rest on their heads or shoulders.

Caution should be exercised any time you move the boom pole. There will times where you’ll need to! Try to avoid the above points as much as possible to minimize handling noise.

For more information on microphone noise and methods to reduce it, check out my article 15 Ways To Effectively Reduce Microphone Noise.

Point The Mic At The Subject

Typical boom mics are “shotgun” mics. The shotgun polar pattern is an extension of the hypercardioid pattern. The pattern is extremely directional, meaning it picks up what it points at a rejects most of the other sounds. For this reason, it’s crucial to point the microphone at the subject.

If we’re recording a person, I tend toward point the mic at the person’s lips.

If you’re tasked with recording multiple people, try to keep up with who’s talking and make an effort to move the mic to best capture the speaker’s voice. Move the mic as little as possible and try to keep each speaker consistent!

Minimize Tripping Hazards

Tripping hazards aren’t much of an issue if you’re recording into your own kit. However, they should be taken seriously if you’re running the XLR to a camera.

The camera may be moving throughout a scene. The camera op will often be intently focused on what he or she is capturing. As a boom op, you’ll have to not only pay attention to the action but also follow the camera operator. If you’re connected via an XLR cable, that’s not only a tripping hazard for you and the camera op, but for everyone else as well!

Stay Out Of The Way

Be sure to physically position your body out of the frame and out of the way of the actors if they’re moving. Unless the shoot is aiming to break the fourth wall, you should never be in the shot! The same goes for your equipment.

So the goal as a boom operator is to stay out of everyone’s way: the camera op(s) and the talent.

But the same goes for making noise. Try to stay as silent as possible during shoots and even between takes (unless it has to do specifically with the job). You’re there to capture the action, not to be the action. 🙂


Choosing A Boom Pole

Now that you know how to properly hold a boom pole, it’s time to talk about choosing one that’s right for you (or for those you’re working with). Boom poles range from under $100 to over $1000. That’s quite a big price range. Let’s look at the variables.

Weight

If you’re going to be holding a boom pole above your head all day, you’ll want it to be as light as possible.

Of course, shorter poles are typically lighter than their longer counterparts. So there’s a balancing game to play there.

Carbon fibre poles are typically lighter than aluminum or plastic.

Length

Length is an obvious dimension to factor in. Longer poles are more versatile (since virtually all boom poles are extendable).

Flex is something to look out for when looking for boom poles. The longer a boom pole is extended, the more it will flex, which isn’t necessarily a good thing.

Noise

Handling noise has the potential to ruin otherwise perfect audio takes. Certain boom poles are more prone to handling noise than others.

Try to find a cabled boom pole (with an interior built-in XLR cable) if possible. Also try to avoid plastic, as it tends to be more prone to handling noise than carbon fiber and aluminum.

Overall Quality

Overall quality goes without saying. The above specs are worthless if the boom pole is not going to work properly, to begin with.

One important factor to look out for is the extension locks. Read reviews on how well they hold up. The last thing you want in a boom pole is for an extension lock to let go, causing the pole to shorten on itself or even worse, slide into two parts.

To learn about my recommended boom poles, check out My New Microphone’s Best Microphone Boom Poles.


A Note On Choosing The Best Boom Microphone

Shotgun microphones are nearly always the best choice when choosing a boom microphone. They are highly directional and will pinpoint the sound source, capturing audio in the direction they point while rejecting most other noises.

However, if you’ll be booming in tight spaces, low ceilings, or in any other situation where the boom mic must be held close to a surface, cardioid pencil microphones will likely yield better audio.

This is because sound waves reflect off surfaces.

Shotgun microphones have rear lobes of sensitivity, which means that they will capture sound to the rear. When positioned close to a reflective surface (wall, ceiling, etc.), this rear lobe will capture sound reflections along with the intended source. This will cause a comb-filtering effect which will thin out the audio.

Shotgun polar pattern graph with rear lobe

For more info on the shotgun polar pattern, check out my article The Lobar/Shotgun Microphone Polar Pattern (With Mic Examples).

Cardioid microphones, on the other hand, have a rear null point and will provide better sound quality when positioned near a surface. This is, of course, at the expense of widening the microphone directionality.

Cardioid polar pattern graph with the rear null point

To learn more about the cardioid polar pattern, check out my article What Is A Cardioid Microphone? (Polar Pattern + Mic Examples).


Photo Critique

Allow me to re-insert the feature photo here. This is me holding a boom pole during a local culinary video shoot:

  • No Dead Cat: Not needed indoors since there is no wind. Additionally, Dead Cats shed and we were shooting in a professional kitchen.
  • Holding the pole comfortably: Above my head with arms extended and a balanced centre of gravity.
  • Looking at the subject: Ensuring the microphone is properly positioned. Close to the subject while remaining out of frame.
  • In line-of-sight with camera operator: Can easily glance over to communicate with the camera operator.
  • Keeping the XLR cable out of the way: This pole did not have an interior cable, so I had to hold it/wrap it around the boom pole. In this shoot, because of the tight quarters in the rest of the kitchen, we decided to plug directly into the camera and eliminate the audio mixer from the equation.

Related articles:

What Are Dead Cats And Why Are Outdoor Microphones Furry?
Best Microphone Windscreens.
Why Do Microphones Use XLR Cables?
Best Microphone Cables.


Related Questions

What is a boom “shotgun” microphone? Shotgun microphones are the most common boom mics. Shotgun mics are designed with a diaphragm at the end of a long slotted tube. The long tube gives them their name. The tube restricts the sound from reaching the diaphragm in specific ways, creating an extremely directional polar pattern.

To learn more about boom microphones, check out my article What Is A Boom Microphone? (Applications + Mic Examples).

Why do boom shotgun microphones have such big windscreens? Shotgun mics on the end of boom poles need plenty of isolation. Shotgun mics are very long and sit in intricately designed shock mounts. Sound enters the tube of the shotgun from the side. The windscreen must be big enough to accommodate the above characteristics and necessities.

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